10 Most Out-Of-This-World Places In Britain!

Britain, the land of hope and glory has so many mesmerizing sights that you often feel like you've already seen the best of it. However, there is always something that can surprise you no matter how much of the world you have seen, we sure reckon that this will be something so extraordinary that visiting these out-of-the-world places in Britain won't just wow you but also make you feel like you’ve been transported to another planet! So be sure to check out at least a few or all for that matter, because there are some real hidden gems here!

1. Redsands Maunsell Forts, Kent

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Located offshore on the Thames estuary, the Maunsell Sea Forts are some of the most bizarre-looking structure positioned off the coast of Whitstable in Kent, Southeast England. Abandoned for the longest time since WW2 where it was used as a form of defence against the Nazi’s. Later it was re-occupied for broadcasting pirate radio in the mid 1960’s! Making it an unbelievable to visit in Britain!

Best time to visit: It’s open all throughout the year but it’s best to see it on a sunny day, or the fog won’t give you a clear look of these ginormous structures.

Highlights: To see them up close, hop on a boat trip from Herne Bay and don’t forget to have its famous fish and chips!

2. Gough's Cave, Somerset

Image Source: Loganathan Parthipan/flickr.com

Considered as one of the most popular caves in Britain due to its sheer size and beauty, you'll find this gorgeous cove situated near the famous "Cheddar Gorge” these stalagmites and stalactites will enchant you with its reflective pool of water which gives you a 3D effect of these icicle formations jetting out of its cove. 

Best time to visit: It’s open all year except on Christmas Eve & Christmas Day, Easter, May and Whitsun School Holidays!

Highlights: Don’t miss out on the look-out tower where you get the stunning view of the 449 ft deep gorge and of course the delicious cheddar cheese washed down by apple cider.

3. Dinosaur Egg Beach at Porth Nanven, Cornwall

Image Source: Wikipedia.org

Situated in Porth Naven on the Southwest toe of England’s Cornish coast, you’ll see chunks of large pebbles strewn around its beach, giving it an uncanny resemblance of dinosaur eggs! Smooth as a baby’s bottom, it is however illegal to take them home as a souvenir. It’s most common visitors are its exotic birds making this a mini haven for birdwatchers and walkers.

Best time to visit: During low-tide or you won’t be able to get a good look of the dinosaur eggs sunken beneath the sand.

Highlights: Dotted by pretty churches and castles it is also home to the Carn Galver mine opened to visitors where you can see restored engine houses near St Just and a paradise for climbing enthusiasts.

4. Ladram Bay, Devon

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Be mesmerized by the sight of the red dramatic cliffs in the middle of Ladram Bay on England’s Jurassic Coast and the vertical columns of free-standing stacks within the cool waters of the bay with a small patch of beach to sun yourself or have a nice picnic with this jaw-dropping view. Either way you’ll feel like you’re in mars with the red earth beneath your feet.

Best time to visit: Any time, even when it’s pouring the sight will blow you away.

Highlights: Take a walk down to Smallstones Point and Chiselbury Bay where the gorgeous sights continue to stretch endlessly. To the east is a hill called High Peak and below the hill is Hern Point and Big Picket Rocks a great place for hiking. 

5. Giant’s Causeway, near Belfast, Northern Ireland

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Due to a violent volcanic eruption 60 million years ago in Britain, the black basalt columns strung off the coast makes it a perfect location for a sci-fi movie. It has also been the talk of town as it has inspired many myths and legends. The most popular story is of a giant called Finn McCool who built this ruin to get to Scotland! It also happens to be a UNESCO world heritage site with its unique symmetry of its columns that will make you take a trip back in time.

Best time to visit: Summer is always the best time to visit, where you can hike alongside the causeway otherwise it be a bit too slippery to climb.

Highlights: Not too far away is the famous bushmill distillery for a quickie and for all you GOT fans, a tour around its famous set locations!  

6. The Callanish Stones, Outer Hebrides, Scotland

Image Source: Chris Combe/flickr.com

If the stonehenge is just way too mainstream for you meet its brother, the Callanish Stones. A bizarre  arrangement of standing stones situated on the Isle of Lewis off the northwest coast of Scotland has puzzled people for hundreds of years. People believe it was meant as an astronomical calendar others believe the stones are of petrified giants frozen in time. Found in the middle of nowhere it does peak a lot of interest.

Best time to visit: Open all year, but the best time to see this stunning site would be in the evening just before the sun sets between the rocks.

Highlights: There are many other tourist attractions around like the Butt Of Lewis Lighthouse (ha ha) and the quaint Gearannan Blackhouse Village. 

7. Eden Project, Cornwall

Image Source: Pixabay.com

At first, you’d be thinking what the bleeping hell is this? You’d think it’s a space colony but in actuality it's a unique hexagonal bio-dome that houses hundreds of unique flora and vegetation and its own largest indoor rainforest making it a raving tourist attraction. While the exterior might take you aback the inside is just surreal.

Best time to visit: Open 365 days a year from 9-6 any day is a great day to visit!

Highlights: Be sure to see Britain’s biggest flower and watch out for its tropical birds in its canopies.

8. Brimham Rocks, Harrogate, Yorkshire

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

These unusual rock formations that seem to defy the laws of gravity can be found in Brimham Rocks in Harrogate, near York and certainly do make quite an impression. Balanced on a tiny rock this monstrous layered rock of 30 ft eroded by water, glaciation and wind, some of which have formed amazing shapes and sizes with amusing names like the Sphinx, the Watchdog, the Camel, the Turtle and the Dancing Bear.

Best time to visit:  It’s Open all year round typically from 8 a.m. until dusk

Highlights: Meet the cutest animal ever the Nidderdale Llamas farm which is not too far away for a quick hello!

9. Fingal's Cave, Inner Hebrides, Scotland

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Eerily beautiful the Fingal’s cave is situated on the Isle of Staffa, one of the smallest islands in Scotland’s group of Inner Hebrides islands. Similar in structure as the Giant’s Causeway, Fingal’s cave has been abandoned for the longest time until a part of it has been restored in the recent years. Truly mystical and a teeny bit spooky as the roaring sound of the waves echo into the unknown. It’s the perfect place for solitude.

Best time to visit: Anytime other than the time it rains as it clogs up the cove making it very risky to cross.

Highlights: Macculloch's fossil tree is a rare sight you cannot miss or the sail through the windy waves of Staffa. 

10. Painshill Park Grotto, Surrey

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

At first you’ll feel like you’ve been cast in the role of Alice in wonderland as the enchanting garden unfolds to this mystical-looking grotto covered in hundreds of thousands of crystals. Be mesmerized by one of the finest remaining examples of the 18th-century English landscape park where every corner looks absolutely surreal.

Best time to visit: The Crystal grotto is open only to visitors on the weekends (12noon-4pm)

Highlights: Visit a quiet medicinal garden not too far from the grotto as well as the famous Hampton court palace

Well there you have it, don’t forget to visit all these magical and alluring places pf Britain because it be an absolute shame if you didn’t!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
JANHAVI DESAI JANHAVI DESAI

Travel Writer & Marketer at TripHobo

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