Places Around the World Where Your Boss Won't Be Able To Reach You

When you travel next, don’t be just a traveller, but be an explorer. Chuck the hubbub of the places that are overrun by the tourists, and go on to find the fascinating small town, untouched mountains, and remote villages, some of which can only be accessed by boat or plane.  

For those who want to get away, we mean really away, these places are just perfect! With no other soul in sight, except for a few nomadic birds in sight, we are sure your boss won’t be able to reach you here.

It’s time to get off the grid!

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1. Sakhalin Island, Kuril Islands, Russia

 

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Located several time zones away from the capital of Russia, Sakhalin Island is a part of the Kuril Islands that are lined just off the eastern coast of Russia. Apart from serving as a bird colony and a breeding ground for the sea lions, the island’s rocky cliffs, unspoiled beaches, and secluded spots would help even the most committed workaholics to unwind and relax.

How to reach: SAT Airlines (Sakhalinskie Aviatrassy) connects you to the nearby towns. Railway enthusiasts can also reach Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk by train. For those wanting to come by road, prepare for a long journey. 

2. Easter Island, Chile

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This Chilean island is shrouded in mystery, thanks to its 900 logic-defying statues. These large stone statues are believed to be carved by the island’s original Polynesian inhabitants many centuries ago, though its purpose and origin still remain unanswered. And even though the island lacks amenities like Wi-Fi and AC, its secluded calm and quiet will ensure you feel re-energized. The island’s economy, of course, runs on tourism.  

How to reach: LAN Airlines operates daily flights from/to Santiago de Chile and once per week to Tahiti. 

3. Tristan da Cunha, Saint Helena

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Nestled in the South Atlantic Ocean, almost half-way between the continents of Africa and South America, Tristan da Cunha was first discovered by Portuguese explorer Tristão da Cunha. The island has a shop, pub, cafe, dance hall, swimming pool, museum and a hell of a view. Often considered as one of the remotest places on earth, you need to be really content with own’s company if you plan on this expedition. 

How to reach: Reachable by a 7-day boat ride from South Africa (Seriously, one can’t get more remote than this)

4. Lake Baikal, Russia

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This lake is about 35 million years old and holds one-fifth of the earth’s unfrozen freshwater. Banana-shaped Baikal is fed by 300 rivers and is home to the most unique and exceptional aquatic life. A summertime favourite comes here leaving your cares behind and indulge in its phenomenal beauty. During winters though, when a few brave tourists come here, this lake and its surroundings are a real fairy-tale. 

How to reach: The nearest airport is in Irkutsk. You can also hop on board the Trans-Siberian Railway to reach Lake Baikal. 

5. Motuo, China

Motuo means “hidden lotus” in Tibetan and the visitors are required to trek across mountains for four days to reach this purest and holiest region in Tibet. The trek starts at the Pai Village, stopping at Lage, before reaching the final destination. The entire region is surrounded by clouds and mist with sunshine trying to make its way past to reach you. Along the way, orchids and large white lilies will keep you company. 

How to reach: You can reach Pai Village by taking a bus from Lhasa in China. 

6. Cocos Islands, Australia

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These tiny little specks of awesomeness call the Indian Ocean their home. The Cocos or Keeling Islands is a group of atolls most of which are uninhabited. Popular activities at the island include Pulu Kelapa Festival, kitesurfing, snorkelling, golf, weddings, fishing, birdwatching, and surfing among many others. Trust us, the relaxation starts the minute you set foot on this island. 

How to reach: Virgin Australia operates two flights per week from Perth. 

7. Torshavn, Faroe Islands

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The town may be small, but they are big on hospitality. Tórshavn is named after Thor and sits on a remote island within the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic Ocean. The city has a quaint charm to it with grassy roofs and cobbled alleyways seen at almost every corner. 

How to reach: Atlantic Airways and Scandinavian Airlines operate daily and direct flights from destinations across Denmark, Scotland, Iceland and Norway

8. Gozo, Malta

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The island of Gozo, unlike its sister Malta, is a sleepy island. This idyllic Mediterranean island has many quaint fishing villages, baroque churches, old stone farmhouses, prehistoric temples, sun-parched Mediterranean landscapes, and peaceful beaches that draw many visitors to the island. The island only comes to life during summers and festivals.   

How to reach: Ferries ply from Ċirkewwa in Malta and Mġarr in Gozo.  

9. Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada

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Canada's Arctic capital Iqaluit’s claim-to-fame is its ‘Road to Nowhere.’ Hike or walk along this winding road and pass along its lakes, rolling hills and tundra, only to end up in the middle of nowhere! Accessible by sea or air, Iqaluit has lots of great outdoors and activities that will make your trip a memorable one. 

How to reach: Daily flights operate from Ottawa. 

10. Nauru, Oceania

This tiny Micronesian island has miles of untouched, white sand beaches but has the least number of tourists coming in, only 200 annually. Measuring just eight square miles, you can jog the entire island. Nauru is also, erm, the fattest country in the world according to the CIA World Factbook. 

How to reach: Our Airline (region’s national airline) flies once a week from Brisbane. 

 

They may seem crazy, but most of these places are a symbol of the earth in its purest form.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ever since my first trip at the age of 4, I’ve been fascinated to explore places around the world. Lover of world cultures, food, souls and all things blue; I spend most part of my day writing about travel ...

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