Central Sikh Museum

Currently Open
  • Address: Golden Temple Rd, Atta Mandi, Katra Ahluwalia, Amritsar Cantt., Punjab 143006, India
    Map
  • Timings: 24-hrs Details
  • Ticket Price: Free
  • Tags: Museums, Family And Kids, Exhibition

To know about the various facades of Sikhism and to know about many eminent Sikh characters, you and your companions can plan to go to the Central Sikh Museum. The very museum also showcases the bravery of the Sikh people who fought historic battles. This museum is a significant part of the Golden Temple complex. The Central Sikh Museum comprises 5 rooms and exhibits a lot of paintings of popular Sikh figures. You can come here every day and the very facility remains open from 8 AM to 7 PM.

  • Buses to stop : Free Bus Service

  • Central Sikh Museum Address: Golden Temple Rd, Atta Mandi, Katra Ahluwalia, Amritsar Cantt., Punjab 143006, India
  • Central Sikh Museum Timing: 24-hrs
  • Central Sikh Museum Price: Free
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  • 0.03% of people who visit Amritsar include Central Sikh Museum in their plan

  • 95% of people start their Central Sikh Museum visit around 11 AM

  • People usually take around 30 Minutes to see Central Sikh Museum

Sunday

95% of people prefer walking in order to reach Central Sikh Museum

People normally also visit The Golden Temple while planning their trip to Central Sikh Museum.

* The facts given above are based on traveler data on TripHobo and might vary from the actual figures
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  • This museum is very conducive to achieve the knowledge about the numerous martyrs who sacrificed their life for religion and welfare of the masses.

  • The Jalian wala bagh is a garden of about 6/7 acres with multistoried houses all around it. Acess to the garden is through very narrow approaches . The bagh or garden is situated very very close to the Golden temple in Amritsar. On Sunday the 13th April 1919 a large crowd of civilian protestors had gathered at the JAlian wala bagh to protest the arrest of two leaders by the British administration; apparently unaware of the curfew orders passed by General Dyer. Enraged at what the General perveived as an act of defiance , he marched to the place of assembly accompanied by armed troops and armoured tanks. He blocked the narrow entrance/exit with the tank and ordered the troops to fire indiscriminately at the crowd, thus killing hundreds of unarmed Indians , men, women and even children. It is reported that more than 1500 bullets were fired that fateful evening. Thanks to the curfew in place medical also was not possible to for those injured . While versions differ on exact count of deaths and injured ;all agree that it ran into many hundreds maybe even thousands. The garden or bagh derives its name from the owners of this land, the family of Jalhevele who originally hailed from the village of Jalia . In 1920 , a trust was formed and a memorial built at the site in memory of the many who were killed and wounded by this armed attack on civilians. The bullet marks on the walls bear mute testimony to the atroicities on that fateful day.

  • It's Not exactly a Museum, it's more of a theatre. If if you have already visited the 7-D show at Gobindgarh Fort, you can skip this one. Ask for an Audio guide if you do not speak/ understand Punjabi

  • Central Sikh Museum preserves the gruesome history of the Sikhs’ martyrdom at the hands of the Mughals, the British, and Operation Bluestar. Established in 1958, the gallery now hosts a collection of portraits of Sikh gurus, saints, warriors and prominent leaders. Visitors will also find a rich collection of coins, arms, and ancient manuscripts, as well as an excellent library. Opening hours: Tuesday-Saturday 12 a.m.-6 p.m., 10 p.m.-12 a.m.; Monday 10 p.m.-12 a.m. only

  • Central Sikh Museum preserves the gruesome history of the Sikhs’ martyrdom at the hands of the Mughals, the British, and Operation Bluestar. Established in 1958, the gallery now hosts a collection of portraits of Sikh gurus, saints, warriors and prominent leaders. Visitors will also find a rich collection of coins, arms, and ancient manuscripts, as well as an excellent library. Opening hours: Tuesday-Saturday 12 a.m.-6 p.m., 10 p.m.-12 a.m.; Monday 10 p.m.-12 a.m. only

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