Dutch Period Museum

42877 Votes Currently Closed
  • Address: Prince Street, Colombo 11, Sri Lanka
    Map
  • Timings: 09:00 am - 05:00 pm Details
  • Phone: +94-112448466
  • Ticket Price: 500 LKR
  • Time Required: 01:30 Hrs
  • Tags: Museums, View Point, Historical Site, Architecture , Specialty Museums, Heritage Building

This unique museum was originally the 17th-century residence of the Dutch governor and has since been used as a Catholic seminary, a military hospital, a police station and a post office. The mansion contains a lovely garden courtyard and has a nice faded feel since a 1977 restoration.

Exhibits include Dutch colonial furniture and other artefacts.

Entrance Ticket Details For Dutch Period Museum

  • The prices for carrying the camera is LKR 250 and video camera is LKR 2000.

How to Reach Dutch Period Museum

  • You can take the cool kangaroo radio cab, the ace cab or rent a taxi service. The cheapest and easiest way is to hire the tuk-tuk.

  • New palm leaf hotel- tea and cake

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  • Dutch Period Museum Address: Prince Street, Colombo 11, Sri Lanka
  • Dutch Period Museum Contact Number: +94-112448466
  • Dutch Period Museum Timing: 09:00 am - 05:00 pm
  • Dutch Period Museum Price: 500 LKR
  • Best time to visit Dutch Period Museum(preferred time): 10:00 am - 04:00 pm
  • Time required to visit Dutch Period Museum: 01:30 Hrs
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  • 48.85% of people who visit Colombo include Dutch Period Museum in their plan

  • 36.88% of people start their Dutch Period Museum visit around 1 PM - 2 PM

  • People usually take around 1 Hr 30 Minutes to see Dutch Period Museum

Monday, Tuesday and Saturday

91.17% of people prefer to travel by car while visiting Dutch Period Museum

People normally club together Old Dutch Hospital and Fort while planning their visit to Dutch Period Museum.

* The facts given above are based on traveler data on TripHobo and might vary from the actual figures

Dutch Period Museum Reviews & Ratings

Google+
  • Awaiting the renovation to be completed. Although of huge historical value, its somewhat dusty and neglected state is hopefully is being brought back to life. Its priceless collection of period furniture and architecture are worth the entrance which was rs500.

  • Important place but it seems like an abandon place , local authorities should pay their attention on it

  • The two storey colonnaded building on Prince Street, Pettah (Colombo 11) which houses this museum was constructed during the Dutch occupation of Colombo (1656 - 1796) and was the formal residence of the Governor of Dutch Ceylon Thomas van Rhee (1634 - 1701) during his term of office in 1692 to 1697. The building has been used for many different purposes over the years. It was a teacher training college and an institute for the instruction of clergymen between 1696 and 1796. At one time it was the residence of Colonel Count August Carl Fredrick Von Ranzow (1759 - 1844). It operated as an orphanage under the supervision of the deacons and financed by the Dutch East Indies Company. It was also used as a hospital. It became a barracks in the second half of the 1800s and in 1900 it was used as a police training school, set up by the British. In 1932 it was converted to the Pettah Post Office. In 1971 following heavy monsoon rains one of the exterior walls collapsed and the building was abandoned. Following protests by the Royal Asiatic Society and the Dutch Burgher Union against plans to demolish the building, in 1973 a committee was established with representatives from the Ceylon Tourist Board, the Department of Archaeology, the Netherlands Alumni Association of Lanka and the National Archives, to restore the building and establish a museum covering the Dutch colonial period. The restoration of the building commenced in 1977, with financial assistance of Netherlands government, and was completed in 1981. This museum was opened to the public in 1982. This building embodies the unique architectural features of a colonial Dutch town house. In 1999 the museum building was formally recognised by the Government as an archaeological protected monument in Sri Lanka. The designation was declared on 18 June under the government Gazette number 1085. The museum while displaying the Dutch legacy with the artifacts including furniture, ceramics, coins and weaponry, portraying the various facets of contemporary life and culture. Special thanks: wiki. Easy access to the museum from Colombo.

  • Unfortunately it's closed for renovations these days. Not sure when they will open it again. However it's good to note that if you're intending to take photos or videos you'll have to purchase a licence at the entrance. So keep that in mind when you're making your budget too. The licences are separately sold for photos and videos and both will cost you around Rs. 600. Hope this will be open soon.

  • The two storey colonnaded building on Prince Street, Pettah (Colombo 11) which houses this museum was constructed during the Dutch occupation of Colombo (1656 - 1796) and was the formal residence of the Governor of Dutch Ceylon Thomas van Rhee (1634 - 1701) during his term of office in 1692 to 1697. The building has been used for many different purposes over the years. It was a teacher training college and an institute for the instruction of clergymen between 1696 and 1796. At one time it was the residence of Colonel Count August Carl Fredrick Von Ranzow (1759 - 1844). It operated as an orphanage under the supervision of the deacons and financed by the Dutch East Indies Company. It was also used as a hospital. It became a barracks in the second half of the 1800s and in 1900 it was used as a police training school, set up by the British. In 1932 it was converted to the Pettah Post Office. In 1971 following heavy monsoon rains one of the exterior walls collapsed and the building was abandoned. Following protests by the Royal Asiatic Society and the Dutch Burgher Union against plans to demolish the building, in 1973 a committee was established with representatives from the Ceylon Tourist Board, the Department of Archaeology, the Netherlands Alumni Association of Lanka and the National Archives, to restore the building and establish a museum covering the Dutch colonial period. The restoration of the building commenced in 1977, with financial assistance of Netherlands government, and was completed in 1981. This museum was opened to the public in 1982. This building embodies the unique architectural features of a colonial Dutch town house. In 1999 the museum building was formally recognised by the Government as an archaeological protected monument in Sri Lanka. The designation was declared on 18 June under the government Gazette number 1085. The museum while displaying the Dutch legacy with the artefacts including furniture, ceramics, coins and weaponry, portraying the various facets of contemporary life and culture.

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