Convent Of Santa Apollonia

Currently Closed
  • Address: Via XXVII Aprile 1, Florence, Italy
    Map
  • Timings: 08:30 am - 01:30 pm Details
  • Phone: +39-0552388607
  • Ticket Price: Free
  • Time Required: 00:30 Mins
  • Tags: Church, Religious Site, Family And Kids

You’d never know, to look at this unassuming little church, that it could hold a secret, but it does. Just one – one of the most beautiful frescoes you’ll ever see – that of Saint Appoline’s Last Supper, on one of the walls of the refectory. There are several additional scenes, for sure, but none match the mastery of this one. Notably, Judas the betrayer’s face has been painted as an ancient symbol of evil – the Satyr.

Some notable paintings by Castagno hang here, such as Castagno’s “Crucifixion”, “Entombment” and “Resurrection” and his two lunettes “Pietà” and “Christ crucified with the Virgin, St John and Saints”.

  • Entry is free.

  • Buses 1, 6, 11, 14, 17, 23, 52, 54, 82, stop Ventisette Aprile - Illum

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  • Convent Of Santa Apollonia Address: Via XXVII Aprile 1, Florence, Italy
  • Convent Of Santa Apollonia Contact Number: +39-0552388607
  • Convent Of Santa Apollonia Timing: 08:30 am - 01:30 pm
  • Convent Of Santa Apollonia Price: Free
  • Best time to visit Convent Of Santa Apollonia(preferred time): 09:00 am - 10:00 am
  • Time required to visit Convent Of Santa Apollonia: 00:30 Mins
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  • 1.38% of people who visit Florence include Convent Of Santa Apollonia in their plan

  • 55.56% of people start their Convent Of Santa Apollonia visit around 09 AM - 10 AM

  • People usually take around 30 Minutes to see Convent Of Santa Apollonia

Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday

95% of people prefer to travel by car while visiting Convent Of Santa Apollonia

People normally club together Accademia Di Belle Arti Di Firenze - Scuola Media Guicciardini and Locanda San Barnaba while planning their visit to Convent Of Santa Apollonia.

* The facts given above are based on traveler data on TripHobo and might vary from the actual figures
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  • Outstanding color in the fresco of The Last Supper

  • Truly a wonderful experience. No crowds, original undisturbed masterwork. See some of these photos here to see just how great.

  • Yet another great Last Supper fresco with a handful of other great artworks.

  • Stunning remains of medieval refectory with beautiful frescoes and paints. Here you are going to observe huge fresco of "The Last Supper".

  • This is located in the remnants of the former Benedictine Convent of Sant'Apollonia, founded in 1339. There is a small museum with paintings by Neri di Bicci, Paolo Schiavo and Andrea del Castagno. It was del Castagno's fresco of the "Last Supper" (1447) that we were there to see. It is stunning and so beautifully preserved. Above is the accompanying "Crucifixion, Deposition and Resurrection" which is not well-preserved. The work was unknown for a long time because the nuns were very reclusive. No one knew it was there. Vasari didn't know about it in the 17th century and it is unknown if Michelangelo knew of it or saw it. It was only rediscovered in 1891. In 1961 when it was removed from the wall for preservation the sinopie (under-drawing outlining the composition) was discovered underneath. In the "Last Supper" figures are life-size (the fresco measures almost 10 metres in length and 4.5 metres high) and very expressive. The use of perspective and foreshortening together with the setting of the table under a loggia lend a 3-dimensional feeling to the work. Other works and sinopie by del Castagno were also on display in the cenacolo. There were a couple of other people who came in whilst we were there. We basically had it to ourselves. There was no entry fee. How amazing it is to be able to pop in through a nondescript door and see such treasures.

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