Nagoya Tourism

Nagoya's cultural history and modern history are both quite rich. It began in twelfth Century as the residence of a local noble. Three important local figures brought prominence by seeking to unite Japan under a single rule. The Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu succeeded in this endeavor and made Nagoya the capital of the Owari Province. The castle was built, and 60,000 people moved into town all at once. For the next few centuries, it was an important cultural and political centre.

During and after the Meiji restoration the city was industrialized heavily - pottery, gun-powder, aircraft and cotton. During WWII, the city produced 50% of Japanese aircraft and engines. During Allied bombing, a lot of the city's precious cultural heritage was lost, though much of it has since been rebuilt.

Today it is one of Japan's largest and most populated cities; with almost ten million people living in the metropolitan area. It is home to Japan's automotive giants - Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi Motors - and other Japanese heavyweight corporations. There are a surprising number of Japanese-descent Brazilian immigrants.

Essential travel information and Nagoya tips for your visit

Time Zone: Japan Time Zone UTC+09:00

Currency: Yen

Electricity and Internet

  • 100 Volts
  • Plug types A and B
  • Ungrounded two pins/ grounded three pins

Languages: Nagoya-dialect Japanese, also called Owari dialect; many people speak basic English

Security

  • Police: 110
  • Ambulance/Fire: 119

Nagoya Medical Association Emergency Center

+81 937–7821

Off-Beaten Path

  • Shikemichi
  • Shirotori Garden

Tipping

  • Do not tip waiters or taxi driver or any service staff
  • Tipping tour guides is alright, but present the money in an envelope. It’s rude to hand it right out of your wallet or hand.

Tourist Traps

  • Oasis 21
  • Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology
  • Osu Shopping Street

Customs

  • Bow when greeting.
  • Learn Japanese honorific. Add a suffix ‘-san’ to most people’s names.
  • Slurp soupy, wet foods
  • The small wet cloth before meals is for your hands ONLY
  • Remove shoes before entering dwellings; remove slippers before getting onto tatami; and don’t wear bathroom slippers anywhere outside the bathroom.
  • Don’t be too outspoken or gregarious. It’s rude.

The best tours and activities in the city, guided by experts to give you a local insight to the best of Nagoya