Moore Square Historic District

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  • Address: Raleigh, NC 27601, United States
    Map
  • Timings: 24-hrs Details
  • Time Required: 01:00 Hrs
  • Tags: Park, Historical Site, Family And Kids

The Moore Square Historic District is one of the key places listed in the National Register of Historic Places. A square park has been established to identify and honor the district and is situated in one of the busiest parts of the town. Inside there is a huge Acorn sculpture which symbolizes Raleigh as the City of Oaks and has some pleasant trees and flowers. One can sit on the benches provided and easily catch their breath for a few moments before jumping back into the hustle-bustle of the city.

Moore Square Historic District Travel Tips

  • Be wary of homeless people in the area.

Entrance Ticket Details For Moore Square Historic District

  • Entry is free.

Moore Square Historic District Hours

  • Square should be accessible 24 hours.

How to Reach Moore Square Historic District

  • By Bus: Bus 3, 4, 6 and others stop at Martin St at Blake St bus station.
  • By renting or hiring a car/taxi.

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  • Moore Square Historic District Address: Raleigh, NC 27601, United States
  • Moore Square Historic District Timing: 24-hrs
  • Best time to visit Moore Square Historic District(preferred time): 10:00 am - 06:00 pm
  • Time required to visit Moore Square Historic District: 01:00 Hrs
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  • 3.7% of people who visit Raleigh include Moore Square Historic District in their plan

  • 70% of people start their Moore Square Historic District visit around 3 PM - 4 PM

  • People usually take around 1 Hr to see Moore Square Historic District

Tuesday, Friday and Sunday

95% of people prefer to travel by car while visiting Moore Square Historic District

People normally club together Historic Oakwood Cemetery and North Carolina Museum Of Natural Sciences while planning their visit to Moore Square Historic District.

* The facts given above are based on traveler data on TripHobo and might vary from the actual figures

Moore Square Historic District Reviews & Ratings

Google+
  • Moore Square is definitely growing right along with the rest of downtown Raleigh. Roots Festival was fun and informative. Everyone in the park seemed genuinely nice for a change. Hopefully they add a historical monument or two within the park. Oh, and Roxi loved it too!

  • This is a great addition to the area. It’s a well use of the space and a nice way to bring the community together. It would be nice if they add more bicycle racks. Other than that, it’s a great place to walk around or just lay down in the grass, and I hope that Raleigh creates more of this.

  • I love the new Moore Square. My young son and I usually come to events here at least once a week, often combined with a trip to Marbles or the farmers market or the night market. Really nice place. I love warm evenings with lots of people just relaxing and having fun here.

  • The remodel of Moore Square is great. Love the open fields, the clean pathways, the landscaping. Especially appreciate the attention to detail and keeping the old historical oak tree is intact. The new square burger shop on the south and is a nice touch. The architecture of the building is pleasing. The remodel of Moore Square is great. Love the open fields, the clean pathways, the landscaping. Especially appreciate the attention to detail and keeping the old historical oak tree is intact. The new square burger shop on the south and is a nice touch. The architecture of the building is pleasing. As a family we’ve already really enjoyed the events taking place in the new square. Excited to see how this will continue to shape downtown’s community in the years to come.

  • It is just me, or was the $13 million price tag and 2-year construction effort excessive given the final result? It seems to me that very little has changed other than the construction of a small burger kiosk (really?), removal of several trees, and a few benches. The N&O had a flowery article by an architect describing all kinds of altruistic philosophy about how the square symbolizes unity and so forth but I call B.S. In my opinion this is was a lost opportunity to create something truly remarkable in DTR, but we wound up with pretty much the same lawn and pathways as we had before the project.

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