Best Time To Visit Reykjavik

The climate of Iceland is cold and wet. The summers are the peak season and see the most number of crowds. The summers are the best time to experience the midnight sun and long days, sometimes even with 24 hours of sunlight. The winters can get extremely cold and it is the best time to catch a glimpse of the northern lights.

  • Summer (June-August): The summer season is the best and the brightest of all seasons in Reykjavik. The summer season boasts long days and pleasant temperatures. The day time temperatures remain between 12 to 13 degrees Celsius. The months of June and July see 24 hours of sunlight. This event offers a unique experience of the midnight sun and an excellent opportunity to explore the outdoors and indulge in sightseeing tours and activities. The town is most expensive during the summer season and the prices usually double. It is essential to carry warm clothing as it tends to get cold.
  • Fall (September): The temperature starts to plummet as the fall season arrives. The day time temperatures during this time of the year are around 7 degrees Celsius. Most of the summer crowds have left by fall and the town also sees a sheer drop in the inflated peak season prices. This is the best time to explore the town if you wish to avoid the crowds. It is possible to get discounts and deals on airfares and hotels during the fall season.
  • Winter (October-April): The winter season is the coldest and the wettest of all seasons. The day time temperatures fall as low as -1 degrees Celsius and the nights tend to be colder. The winters are considered as the off season and boasts long nights and short days with the sun only peeking out for three or four hours in December and January. There is a significant drop is the airfares and hotel prices.
  • Spring (May): As Spring arrives, the days tend to get longer and the temperatures start to rise. The summer crowds have not arrived yet so the town is still cheaper as compared to the peak season inflated prices. One might still see some snow on the ground and it is essential to carry warm clothing. The prices rise as the peak season approaches so make sure to book in advance.

The best season to visit Reykjavik is during the summers. The summer season boasts long days and pleasant bearable temperatures making it a perfect time to visit the city. However, if you wish to avoid inflated prices and summer crowds, you can consider going during the fall season followed by the spring season.

  • 80℉
  • 60℉
  • 40℉
  • 20℉ 0℉
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Highest temperature in Reykjavik is recorded as 69.8℉ in July.

Lowest temperature in Reykjavik is recorded as 17.6℉ in November.

  • 100
  • 75
  • 50
  • 25 0
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Most humid month in Reykjavik is February.

Least humid month in Reykjavik is June.

Reykjavik
Ask question in category
  • Is there much snow and ice presently in Iceland? Am leaving this weekend. Should I pack boots and bring ice grips?

    Answer Report Abuse
    • If you are visiting Reykjavik and surrounding areas, then there isn't much snow, but the weather is certainly winter-y. Light snow ix expected around November-end. If you will need boots or ice grips depends on the activities you are planning to do. But, I would suggest carrying enough winter gear. 

      Report Abuse
  • Would February and march be better months than November to view the Northern lights

    Answer Report Abuse
    • Since it is a naturally occurring phenomenon, it is difficult to predict when you can see the Northern Lights better. But, January to March is the most popular time period to view them amongst enthusiasts. November is also a good month, but at times the snow clouds may cover the skies. 

      Report Abuse
  • can we see northern lights in august

    Answer Report Abuse
    • It isn't impossible to see the northern lights in August, but it becomes a very rare phenomenon. The northern lights last tour is conducted on April 15th and then restarted around September 15th for the sole reason that the lights are rarely spotted during summer. But, there have been times, when visitors have been lucky enough to see them.   

      Report Abuse