Austrian Parliament Building

Currently Closed
  • Address: Dr. Karl-Renner Ring 3, Vienna 1017, Austria
    Map
  • Timings: 06:30 am - 07:00 pm Details
  • Phone: +43-1401100
  • Ticket Price: 5 EUR
  • Time Required: 00:15 Mins
  • Tags: Family And Kids, Architecture , Heritage Building

Austrian Parliament Building - Review

A must visit for photographer professionals as well as amateurs, the Parliament building is an architectural marvel. Built in the Greek Roman style, this building looks absolutely stunning and awe inspiring. Its historical rooms are used as residence for the Austrian National and Federal council. Designed by the architect Theophil Hansen, a walk through this building will take you back in the world of ancient Greece with rooms that are decorated with self-designed furniture, chandeliers and pictures. Of special interest will be the 5,5 m high statue of Pallas Athene which stands in the middle of a large fountain, located just outside the building.

Austrian Parliament Building Information

  • If you are attending a guided tour, the tour lasts for around 55 minutes.
  • The tours are conducted as per parliamentary sessions. 
  • Photography is probably prohibited within the building premises.

Austrian Parliament Building Ticket Prices

Tickets for guided tours:

  • Adult: € 5,00
  • Individual ticket/reduced: € 2,50
  • For persons aged 19 or under: Free
  • Physically disadvantaged visitors: Free

The premises are only accessible with a guided tour based on various topics such as architecture or everyday life in politics, duration approx. 1 hour.

The plenary meetings of the National Council are open for public access without charge.

Austrian Parliament Building Hours

  • For detailed timings of guided tours, refer to the website.

How To reach Austrian Parliament Building by Public Transport

  • Stadiongasse/Parlament tram stop
  • Dr.Karl Renner Ring tram stop

Restaurants Near Austrian Parliament Building

  • Restaurant im Parlament
  • Alex. Ander’s restaurant

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TripHobo Highlights for Austrian Parliament Building

  • Austrian Parliament Building Address: Dr. Karl-Renner Ring 3, Vienna 1017, Austria
  • Austrian Parliament Building Contact Number: +43-1401100
  • Austrian Parliament Building Timing: 06:30 am - 07:00 pm
  • Austrian Parliament Building Price: 5 EUR
  • Best time to visit Austrian Parliament Building(preferred time): 08:00 am - 06:00 pm
  • Time required to visit Austrian Parliament Building: 00:15 Mins
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Things to Know Before Visiting Austrian Parliament Building

  • 20.43% of people who visit Vienna include Austrian Parliament Building in their plan

  • 60.87% of people start their Austrian Parliament Building visit around 3 PM - 4 PM

  • People usually take around 30 Minutes to see Austrian Parliament Building

Monday, Wednesday and Thursday

68.24% of people prefer to travel by car while visiting Austrian Parliament Building

People normally club together Technisches Museum Wien and Museumsquartier while planning their visit to Austrian Parliament Building.

* The facts given above are based on traveler data on TripHobo and might vary from the actual figures

Austrian Parliament Building Trips

Austrian Parliament Building, Vienna Reviews

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  • Amazing greek revival building. Great plaza. Looked to be a faithful reproduction of the Parthenon in Athens. Was really good visit!

  • I'm sure the building is magnificent and the statue looked beautiful. I will say that it is under renovation, so it's probably not worth the trip if you are coming just for the building. See the photo. (Press like if this helped.)

  • The Austrian Parliament Building (German: Parlamentsgebäude, colloquially das Parlament) in Vienna is where the two houses of the Austrian Parliament conduct their sessions. The building is located on the Ringstraße boulevard in the first district Innere Stadt, near Hofburg Palace and the Palace of Justice. It was built to house the two chambers of the Imperial Council (Reichsrat), the bicameral legislature of the Cisleithanian (Austrian) part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Since its construction, the Parliament Building has been the seat of these two houses, and their successors—the National Council (Nationalrat) and the Federal Council (Bundesrat)—of the Austrian legislature. The foundation stone was laid in 1874; the building was completed in 1883. The architect responsible for its Greek Revival style was Theophil Hansen. He designed the building holistically, aiming to have each element harmonizing with all the others. He was therefore also responsible for the interior decoration, such as statues, paintings, furniture, chandeliers, and numerous other elements. Hansen was honored by Emperor Franz Joseph with the title of Freiherr (Baron) after its completion. Following heavy damage and destruction in World War II, most of the interior has been restored to its original splendour. The parliament building covers over 13,500 square meters, making it one of the largest structures on Ringstraße. It contains over one hundred rooms, the most important of which are the Chambers of the National Council, the Federal Council, and the former Imperial House of Representatives (Abgeordnetenhaus). The building also includes committee rooms, libraries, lobbies, dining rooms, bars and gymnasiums. One of the building's most famous features is the Pallas Athena fountain in front of the main entrance, built by Carl Kundmann after plans from Hansen, from 1898 to 1902 and it is a notable Viennese tourist attraction. The Parliament Building is the site of important state ceremonies, most notably the swearing-in ceremony of the President of Austria and the state speech on National Day each October 26. The building is closely associated with the two parliamentary bodies, as is shown by the use of the term Hohes Haus as a metonym for "Parliament". Parliamentary offices spill over into nearby buildings, such as the Palais Epstein.

  • No flags in the entire city 0 love for their own nation. What a disgusting way to treat your country. 0/10

  • The Austrian Parliament Building in Vienna is where the two houses of the Austrian Parliament conduct their sessions. The building is located on the Ringstraße boulevard in the first district Innere Stadt, near Hofburg Palace and the Palace of Justice. It was built to house the two chambers of the Imperial Council (Reichsrat), the bicameral legislature of the Cisleithanian (Austrian) part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Since its construction, the Parliament Building has been the seat of these two houses, and their successors—the National Council (Nationalrat) and the Federal Council (Bundesrat)—of the Austrian legislature. The foundation stone was laid in 1874; the building was completed in 1883. The architect responsible for its Greek Revival style was Theophil Hansen. He designed the building holistically, aiming to have each element harmonizing with all the others. He was therefore also responsible for the interior decoration, such as statues, paintings, furniture, chandeliers, and numerous other elements. Hansen was honored by Emperor Franz Joseph with the title of Freiherr (Baron) after its completion. Following heavy damage and destruction in World War II, most of the interior has been restored to its original splendour. The parliament building covers over 13,500 square meters, making it one of the largest structures on Ringstraße. It contains over one hundred rooms, the most important of which are the Chambers of the National Council, the Federal Council, and the former Imperial House of Representatives (Abgeordnetenhaus). The building also includes committee rooms, libraries, lobbies, dining rooms, bars and gymnasiums. One of the building's most famous features is the Pallas Athena fountain in front of the main entrance, built by Carl Kundmann after plans from Hansen, from 1898 to 1902 and it is a notable Viennese tourist attraction. The Parliament Building is the site of important state ceremonies, most notably the swearing-in ceremony of the President of Austria and the state speech on National Day each October 26. The building is closely associated with the two parliamentary bodies, as is shown by the use of the term Hohes Haus as a metonym for "Parliament". Parliamentary offices spill over into nearby buildings, such as the Palais Epstein.

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